sensitivity

Receiving an unexpected call from a good friend is a delight; especially if they’re not calling because the need something.

Many of us have resorted to sending messages when we intend to have little conversations, because it’s quicker, easier and usually more convenient.

We shoot people messages to check-in, to organise, and to notify, because it’s a quick time save – if the person isn’t available in the moment you’re trying to contact them, it doesn’t matter.

By replacing dynamic conversation with text based alternative, we’re missing opportunites for connection.

For a week, try calling someone first every time you get the the urge to start a conversation which could be had over the phone by sending a message.

If they respond, great! After doing this repeatedly, see if you notice any difference in how connected you feel to your circles.

When people don’t respond, that’s okay too! Just send them the message you intended to send from the beginning.

I’m willing to bet that the extra 10 seconds invested listening to dial tones will reward you with immensley richer conversation.

The tiles in your bathroom are exactly the same temperature as your bathmat.

But it don’t feel that way.

Physics 101 taught us that when things feel hot or cold, it’s not their actual temperatures we’re meassuing. We only feel temperature of things in relation to ourselves.

When you first dive into a pool on a warm day, it feels freezing at first because your body was acclimatised to the heat outside.

But as your skin cools to an equilibrium temperature with the water, the water seems to get warmer.

In reality, you jumping in barely changes the temperature of the pool water at all.

But the variance in temperature between your skin and the water has reduced greatly as your body has cooled.

Hopping back to bathroom tiles, the second factor we need to understand when thinking about temperature exchange is the conductivity of different things.

When you walk into your bathroom in the morning, you dart over the tiles and onto the bathmat not because it’s warmer, but because it takes a lot longer to exchange it’s temperature with yours.

Before you enter the room they are exactly the same temperature, and each share the exact same variance in temperature with the sole of your foot.

The difference is that your tiles are far more conductive. They equalise temperature with your feet much quicker than the bathmat.

The tiles have a higher capacity for receiving and exchanging heat. The tiles are more sensitive to the incoming heat transferred through your foot. They experience your heat more intensely, and you experience a more intebse feeling of cold.

In a similar way, some people are more sensitive to certain inputs that others.

This conductivity is not necessarily a weakness. Even if at times it’s inconvenient.

Tiles and bathmats each serve their purpose.

Don’t judge a book by it’s conductivity.